April 22

Image result for spring images

April 22- May 3

April 22 EARTH DAY/ MAKER DAY, MI Smile Program,Mad Science Club 3:30

April 24  Muffins with Mom 6:30

April 25  First Grade Field Trip

April 26  Fun Run!!!!

April 29 Healthy Kids Club 3:40

April 30 Fourth Grade M-Step- ELA

May 1 Third Grade M-Step- ELA

May 2 Fourth Grade M-Step- Math,Healthy Kids Club 3:40, PTA Meeting 6:00

Vision

…to inspire a passion for lifelong learning.

Mission

Our mission is to empower all students to be advocates for themselves and others.  Each student will be taught essential life-long skills in a secure, respectful environment.

Image result for school lunch golden tray clipart

Golden Tray Award Winners

April 8-12

Mrs. Easlick’s Class, Mrs. A’s Class, Ms Robertson’s Class, Miss Darin’s Class

Limited Schools of Choice Program for 2019-20

 The Allen Park Public School District has established a successful Schools of Choice Program for the past several years and the Board of Education has approved continuation of the program for the 2019-20 school year for Kindergarten through 8th Grade.  (Requests for specific elementary schools cannot be guaranteed)

Applications will be available beginning Monday, April 8, 2019 at the Riley Education Center, 9601 Vine or at http://www.allenparkschools.com Completed applications will be accepted beginning Monday, April 8 through Friday, April 26, 2019 from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. weekdays in the Pupil Accounting Office at the Riley Education Center. Completed applications may also be emailed to schoolofchoice@appublicschools.com by Friday, April 26, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.  Absolutely no late applications can be accepted.

A random draw selection will be held on Tuesday, April 30 at 9:00 a.m. at the Riley Education Center.  The draw will determine numerical selection for acceptance of candidates.

We ask that you help us by sharing this information with friends and/or family members who may be interested in having their children become a part of the Allen Park Public Schools Family.

For more information about the Schools of Choice Program, please see the attached FAQ’s, visit our website at http://www.allenparkschools.com or call (313) 827-2105.

Schools of Choice Program Info 2019-20-1pahck9

Allen Park Preschool Program

AP Preschool Program 2019-20 OPEN HOUSE & REGISTRATION INFO-1pc36ys

Congratulations to our INCREDIBLE Lindemann Reading Support Team!!!!
Your support, uncompromising  work ethic, and dedication to our kids is hands down, TOP NOTCH!!!!!

MOBILE DENTIST IS COMING TO Lindemann ON APRIL 22TH (SEE LINKS BELOW)

After-Hour Emergencies-1wmaa7e

Letter to Parents – Big Smile – English-Spanish (1)-178vxyg

Allen Park Summer Kids Camp is open to all districts and offers children ages 3-13 an opportunity to enjoy a variety of fun activities, field trips and more! Each week offers a different theme and a special event. Our staff will help your child have fun, make memories, and create friendships in a fun and relaxed atmosphere.  Flyer with more info attached – registration form on district website – allenparkschools.com – https://www.allenparkschools.com/apps/pages/index.jsp?uREC_ID=971884&type=d&pREC_ID=1292547

Allen Park Public Schools Latchkey Program is designed to provide children with a safe, well-supervised environment when an adult is unable to be at home. The activities include crafts, games, outdoor and indoor play. Our program is play-based and encourages a relaxed environment for the child who is in school all day. We are licensed with the State of Michigan to take care of children between the ages of 3 and 13 years of age.  Flyer with more info attached – registration form on district website – allenparkschools.com – https://www.allenparkschools.com/apps/pages/index.jsp?uREC_ID=971884&type=d&pREC_ID=1292543

 

SHOUT OUT!!  During spring break, first Grade student, Kaiden Mifsud wrestled and placed 2nd place at States and 7th place at Nationals!!!

Mrs. Bowdell’s shout out to Lindemann students getting in some physical activity during Spring Break!

Mrs. Bowdell’s shout out to students from Mrs. Robertson’s class having fun with hula huts!

Tiger’s Game with 5th Grade Safeties and Mentors!!!!

 

 

Image result for safety town

Safety Town is an interactive safety awareness program for children from 5-6 years of age. Each day the children will be introduced to various safety issues in a fun and safe environment. The program is taught by a Police Officer and an AP teacher, with hands-on topics led by community guest speakers as well as visits from the Allen Park Police & Fire Departments. Teen volunteers from Allen Park High School lead the children through Safety Town every day and receive valuable training along with obtaining National Honor Society service hours. The children learn about stranger danger, water and beach as well as playground safety, fire safety, pet and bus safety, electrical and gun safety, and personal safety with an emphasis on pedestrian safety. The kids will be bicycling through a miniature town complete with streets, sidewalks, buildings, stop signs and a working traffic signal. Importance is placed on having the children memorize a cell phone number to call if they should ever become lost. We use fun songs to reinforce all of these principles and the children memorize our very own Safety Town Pledge!

Parent Orientation: All children and parents will meet for a 30 minute orientation on the first day of your session (Children stay for full session).  It is the parent’s responsibility to bring their child to Safety Town daily and to pick them up promptly. Parents who will have someone else picking up the child will designate that on the enrollment form the first day.

Safety Town REGISTRATION 2019-18qyuq5

Please take a look at the resources available to families to help you understand the upcoming 2019 MSTEP:

Free Test Practice Opportunities for All Students That Make a Difference
All students have access to sample test questions and practice tests online.
Students in grades K-8 and 11 can access sample items using the Chrome browser (https://wbte.drcedirect.com/MI/portals/mi).

State_Assessment_in_Michigan_Presentation-q28lzk

April 1 -21

Image result for april showers imagesApril 1-21

April 1-7 Spring Break

April 8 Mad Science Club 3:35, Healthy Kids Club 3:35, Elementary Honor Choir 6:30

April 9  Fifth Grade M-Step, Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

April 10 Safeties Comerica Park,  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

April 11 Fifth Grade M-Step,  Healthy Kids Club 3:40, PTA Meeting 6:00

April 12 Spring Pictures

April 15  Mad Science Club 3:35, Healthy Kids Club 3:35, Board Meeting 7:00

April 16  PBIS Meeting 7:45, MTSS Meetings

April 17 District PBIS 1:00, 5th Grade Basketball Game 5:30, Fifth Grade M-Step,

April 18   Healthy Kids Club 3:35

April 19 NO SCHOOL- GOOD FRIDAY

Vision

…to inspire a passion for lifelong learning.

Mission

Our mission is to empower all students to be advocates for themselves and others.  Each student will be taught essential life-long skills in a secure, respectful environment.

Image result for school lunch golden tray clipart

Golden Tray Award Winners

Week of March 19

Mr Fasca’s Class, Mrs. A’s Class, Ms Messina’s Class, Mrs. Lacey’s Class,

Mr. Wahl’s Class, Mrs. Kusulas’s Class, Mr Lafferty’s Class

Week of March 25

Mrs. Easlicks Class, Mrs. Page’s Class, Mrs. Lacey’s Class, Mrs. Bergman’s Class,

Ms. Soranno’s Class

Limited Schools of Choice Program for 2019-20

 The Allen Park Public School District has established a successful Schools of Choice Program for the past several years and the Board of Education has approved continuation of the program for the 2019-20 school year for Kindergarten through 8th Grade.  (Requests for specific elementary schools cannot be guaranteed)

Applications will be available beginning Monday, April 8, 2019 at the Riley Education Center, 9601 Vine or at http://www.allenparkschools.com Completed applications will be accepted beginning Monday, April 8 through Friday, April 26, 2019 from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. weekdays in the Pupil Accounting Office at the Riley Education Center. Completed applications may also be emailed to schoolofchoice@appublicschools.com by Friday, April 26, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.  Absolutely no late applications can be accepted.

A random draw selection will be held on Tuesday, April 30 at 9:00 a.m. at the Riley Education Center.  The draw will determine numerical selection for acceptance of candidates.

We ask that you help us by sharing this information with friends and/or family members who may be interested in having their children become a part of the Allen Park Public Schools Family.

For more information about the Schools of Choice Program, please see the attached FAQ’s, visit our website at http://www.allenparkschools.com or call (313) 827-2105.

Schools of Choice Program Info 2019-20-1pahck9

Allen Park Preschool Program

AP Preschool Program 2019-20 OPEN HOUSE & REGISTRATION INFO-1pc36ys
Safety Town Registration
Safety Town REGISTRATION 2019-18qywk3
 

   

OWL PELLET DISSECTION (Mrs. Lorenz)

     

 

Don’t Forget Breakfast!

April is a month where students take standardized tests. Your child’s ability to learn and succeed in the classroom improves when he or she has eaten breakfast. When your children eat breakfast at home, try to include three different food groups. An example of this might be low-sugar, whole-grain cereal with milk and a glass of 100% fruit juice or a sliced banana on the cereal.  If time is not on your side, that’s okay! Whole grain waffles, a handful of nuts and an apple to eat in the car on the way to school will work. A peanut butter and banana sandwich is also easy to eat on the go and tastes great! Don’t forget that leftovers from the night before can make a good breakfast. Or you could make a fruit smoothie! Blend whatever fresh, frozen, or canned fruits you have on hand with ½ cup of low-fat or non-fat yogurt and you’ve got a delicious breakfast ready to go!  Lastly, you can always pack a breakfast to go the night before, so you don’t have to worry about making breakfast in the morning.

MOBILE DENTIST IS COMING TO Lindemann ON APRIL 22TH (SEE LINKS BELOW)

After-Hour Emergencies-1wmaa7e

Letter to Parents – Big Smile – English-Spanish (1)-178vxyg

AUBREY PESCHKE
 DONATIONS NEEDED PLEASE
MAKER DAY

maker day-2o03sxv

 

RETEACHING EXPECTATIONS

One of the most important features of our Tier 1 instruction for positive behaviors, is the explicit teaching of expectations.  As we see some warmer temperatures, our students will benefit from great practice in the things we expect of them each day — lining up in an orderly way; walking silently in the hall; cleaning up the classroom at the end of each day; and more.  Please let me know if you would like suggestions for review!

Mrs. Bowdell- PE

Outfielders from Mrs. Torok’s class who went out of their way to make sure that everyone had a chance to succeed

Allen Park Swimming Program
 Please note these spring/summer programs will be held at the ALLEN PARK HIGH SCHOOL POOL.

Open Swim Spring 2019-1yb3xw0

SUMMERBarracudaFlyer 2019-18665r4

SWIM LESSONS flyer Spring 2019-1lkxmuc

Why Children Aren’t Behaving, And What You Can Do About It

Jun 3, 2018

 (Michelle Kondrich for NPR)

Childhood — and parenting — have radically changed in the past few decades, to the point where far more children today struggle to manage their behavior.

That’s the argument Katherine Reynolds Lewis makes in her new parenting book, The Good News About Bad Behavior.

We face a crisis of self-regulation,” Lewis writes. And by “we,” she means parents and teachers who struggle daily with difficult behavior from the children in their lives.

Lewis, a journalist, certified parent educator and mother of three, asks why so many kids today are having trouble managing their behavior and emotions.

Three factors, she says, have contributed mightily to this crisis.

First: Where, how and how much kids are allowed to play has changed. Second, their access to technology and social media has exploded.

Finally, Lewis suggests, children today are too “unemployed.” She doesn’t simply mean the occasional summer job for a high school teen. The term is a big tent, and she uses it to include household jobs that can help even toddlers build confidence and a sense of community.

“They’re not asked to do anything to contribute to a neighborhood or family or community,” Lewis tells NPR in a recent interview. “And that really erodes their sense of self-worth — just as it would with an adult being unemployed.”

Below is more of that interview, edited for length and clarity.

What sorts of tasks are children and parents prioritizing instead of household responsibilities?

To be straight-A students and athletic superstars, gifted musicians and artists — which are all wonderful goals, but they are long-term and pretty narcissistic. They don’t have that sense of contribution and belonging in a family the way that a simple household chore does, like helping a parent prepare a meal. Anyone who loves to cook knows it’s so satisfying to feed someone you love and to see that gratitude and enjoyment on their faces. And kids today are robbed of that.

It’s part of the work of the family. We all do it, and when it’s more of a social compact than an adult in charge of doling out a reward, that’s much more powerful. They can see that everyone around them is doing jobs. So it seems only fair that they should also.

Kids are so driven by what’s fair and what’s unfair. And that’s why the more power you give kids, the more control you give them, the more they will step up.

You also argue that play has changed dramatically. How so?

Two or three decades ago, children were roaming neighborhoods in mixed-age groups, playing pretty unsupervised or lightly supervised. They were able to resolve disputes, which they had a strong motivation to because they wanted to keep playing. They also planned their time and managed their games. They had a lot of autonomy, which also feeds self-esteem and mental health.

Nowadays, kids, including my own, are in child care pretty much from morning until they fall into bed — or they’re under the supervision of their parents. So they aren’t taking small risks. They aren’t managing their time. They aren’t making decisions and resolving disputes with their playmates the way that kids were 20 or 30 years ago. And those are really important social and emotional skills for kids to learn, and play is how all young mammals learn them.

While we’re on the subject of play and the importance of letting kids take risks, even physical risks, you mention a remarkable study out of New Zealand — about phobias. Can you tell us about it?

This study dates back to when psychologists believed that if you had a phobia as an adult, you must have had some traumatic experience as a child. So they started looking at people who had phobias and what their childhood experiences were like. In fact, they found the opposite relationship.

People who had a fall from heights were less likely to have an adult phobia of heights. People who had an early experience with near-drowning had zero correlation with a phobia of water, and children who were separated from their parents briefly at an early age actually had less separation anxiety later in life.

We need to help kids to develop tolerance against anxiety, and the best way to do that, this research suggests, is to take small risks — to have falls and scrapes and tumbles and discover that they’re capable and that they can survive being hurt. Let them play with sticks or fall off a tree. And yeah, maybe they break their arm, but that’s how they learn how high they can climb.

You say in the book that “we face a crisis of self-regulation.” What does that look like at home and in the classroom?

It’s the behavior in our homes that keeps us from getting out the door in the morning and keeps us from getting our kids to sleep at night.

In schools, it’s kids jumping out of seats because they can’t control their behavior or their impulses, getting into shoving matches on the playground, being frozen during tests because they have such high rates of anxiety.

Really, I lump under this umbrella of self-regulation the increase in anxiety, depression, ADHD, substance addiction and all of these really big challenges that are ways kids are trying to manage their thoughts, behavior and emotions because they don’t have the other skills to do it in healthy ways.

You write a lot about the importance of giving kids a sense of control. My 6-year-old resists our morning schedule, from waking up to putting on his shoes. Where is the middle ground between giving him control over his choices and making sure he’s ready when it’s time to go?

It’s a really tough balance. We start off, when our kids are babies, being in charge of everything. And our goal by the time they’re 18 is to be in charge of nothing — to work ourselves out of the job of being that controlling parent. So we have to constantly be widening the circle of things that they’re in charge of, and shrinking our own responsibility.

It’s a bit of a dance for a 6-year-old, really. They love power. So give him as much power as you can stand and really try to save your direction for the things that you don’t think he can do.

He knows how to put on his shoes. So if you walk out the door, he will put on his shoes and follow you. It may not feel like it, but eventually he will. And if you spend five or 10 minutes outside that door waiting for him — not threatening or nagging — he’ll be more likely to do it quickly. It’s one of these things that takes a leap of faith, but it really works.

Kids also love to be part of that discussion of, what does the morning look like. Does he want to draw a visual calendar of the things that he wants to get done in the morning? Does he want to set times, or, if he’s done by a certain time, does he get to do something fun before you leave the house? All those things that are his ideas will pull him into the routine and make him more willing to cooperate.

Whether you’re trying to get your child to dress, do homework or practice piano, it’s tempting to use rewards that we know our kids love, especially sweets and screen time. You argue in the book: Be careful. Why?

Yes. The research on rewards is pretty powerful, and it suggests that the more we reward behavior, the less desirable that behavior becomes to children and adults alike. If the child is coming up with, “Oh, I’d really like to do this,” and it stems from his intrinsic interests and he’s more in charge of it, then it becomes less of a bribe and more of a way that he’s structuring his own morning.

The adult doling out rewards is really counterproductive in the long term — even though they may seem to work in the short term. The way parents or teachers discover this is that they stop working. At some point, the kid says, “I don’t really care about your reward. I’m going to do what I want.” And then we have no tools. Instead, we use strategies that are built on mutual respect and a mutual desire to get through the day smoothly.

You offer pretty simple guidance for parents when they’re confronted with misbehavior and feel they need to dole out consequences. You call them the four R’s. Can you walk me through them?

The four R’s will keep a consequence from becoming a punishment. So it’s important to avoid power struggles and to win the kid’s cooperation. They are: Any consequence should be revealed in advance, respectful, related to the decision the child made, and reasonable in scope.

Generally, by the time they’re 6 or 7 years old, kids know the rules of society and politeness, and we don’t need to give them a lecture in that moment of misbehavior to drill it into their heads. In fact, acting in that moment can sometimes be counterproductive if they are amped up, their amygdala’s activated, they’re in a tantrum or exploited state, and they can’t really learn very well because they can’t access the problem-solving part of their brain, the prefrontal cortex, where they’re really making decisions and thinking rationally. So every misbehavior doesn’t need an immediate consequence.

You even tell parents, in the heat of the moment, it’s OK to just mumble and walk away. What do you mean?

That’s when you are looking at your child, they are not doing what you want, and you cannot think of what to do. Instead of jumping in with a bribe or a punishment or yelling, you give yourself some space. Pretend you had something on the stove you need to grab or that you hear something ringing in the other room and walk away. That gives you just a little space to gather your thoughts and maybe calm down a little bit so you can respond to their behavior from the best place in you — from your best intentions as a parent.

I can imagine skeptics out there, who say, “But kids need to figure out how to live in a world that really doesn’t care what they want. You’re pampering them!” In fact, you admit your own mother sometimes feels this way. What do you say to that?

I would never tell someone who’s using a discipline strategy that they feel really works that they’re wrong. What I say to my mom is, “The tools and strategies that you used and our grandparents used weren’t wrong, they just don’t work with modern kids.” Ultimately, we want to instill self-discipline in our children, which will never happen if we’re always controlling them.

If we respond to our kids’ misbehavior instead of reacting, we’ll get the results we want. I want to take a little of the pressure off of parenting; each instance is not life or death. We can let our kids struggle a little bit. We can let them fail. In fact, that is the process of childhood when children misbehave. It’s not a sign of our failure as parents. It’s normal.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

 

March 18-31

March 18-31

3/18 Mad Science Club 3:35-4:35

3/19 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30, Chess Club 3:30

3/20 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

3/21 World Down Syndrome Day, Bingo for Books 6:30

3/22 Vision Screening K, 1, 3, 5

3/25-29 Book Fair

2/25 Mad Science Club 3:35, Healthy Kids Club 3:30,

3/26-28 Fifth Grade Camp

3/26 Chess Club 3:30

3/28  Healthy Kids Club 3:35

3/29 PBIS Monthly Reward; 11:30 Dismissal

Apr. 1-7:  No School-Spring Break

Apr. 19:  No School-Good Friday

May 27:  No School-Memorial Day

 

Vision

…to inspire a passion for lifelong learning.

Mission

Our mission is to empower all students to be advocates for themselves and others.  Each student will be taught essential life-long skills in a secure, respectful environment.

Image result for school lunch golden tray clipart

Golden Tray Award Winners

Week of March 3/4

Mrs. Easlick’s Class, Mrs. Latigo’s Class, Ms Robertson’s Class

Mrs. Chimenti’s Class, Mr. Wahl’s Class, Mr. McDermott’s Class

Mr. Lafferty’s Class

Week of March 3/11

Ms VanMaele, Mrs Latigo, Ms Robertson, Mrs. Lacey

Mrs Bergman, Mr Lafferty

PE with Mrs. Bowdell

Gavin Pierfederici set a record for most points earned by a single hitter during our baseball activity!

Mr. Lafferty’s class made “Chicken Baseball” super fun by being extra supportive and encouraging of one another.

Limited Schools of Choice Program for 2019-20

 The Allen Park Public School District has established a successful Schools of Choice Program for the past several years and the Board of Education has approved continuation of the program for the 2019-20 school year for Kindergarten through 8th Grade.  (Requests for specific elementary schools cannot be guaranteed)

Applications will be available beginning Monday, April 8, 2019 at the Riley Education Center, 9601 Vine or at http://www.allenparkschools.com Completed applications will be accepted beginning Monday, April 8 through Friday, April 26, 2019 from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. weekdays in the Pupil Accounting Office at the Riley Education Center. Completed applications may also be emailed to schoolofchoice@appublicschools.com by Friday, April 26, 2019 at 4:00 p.m.  Absolutely no late applications can be accepted.

A random draw selection will be held on Tuesday, April 30 at 9:00 a.m. at the Riley Education Center.  The draw will determine numerical selection for acceptance of candidates.

We ask that you help us by sharing this information with friends and/or family members who may be interested in having their children become a part of the Allen Park Public Schools Family.

For more information about the Schools of Choice Program, please see the attached FAQ’s, visit our website at http://www.allenparkschools.com or call (313) 827-2105.

Schools of Choice Program Info 2019-20-1pahck9

BROWN AND JUANITA C. FORD ART GALLERY

DOWNRIVER CAMPUS 21000 Northline Road, Taylor, MI 48180

OPENING RECEPTION Thursday, March 28, 2019 • 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

EXHIBITION March 28 through April 25, 2019 Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday • 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

artgallery@wcccd.edu

Artwork: Allen Park Schools Students

For more information, please call 313-496-2704 or visit our website at http://www.wcccd.edu

Three 5th grade students were selected for the flyer for our district art show- BUGS –  opening later this month!

 
Sienna Agemy
Codey Farley
Connor Brayman

April 1-7

Spring Has Sprung!

Now that it stays light longer and there are warmer days, it’s easier to get outside and exercise.  What physical activities can your family do together?  Walk, dance, ride bikes, jump rope, go to the recreation center to swim or workout.  Walking instead of driving saves gas money and is good for you.  If you like close enough to school, do you have time in your schedule to walk to school with your kids?  Or walk there to use the playground?

Aubrey Peschke/ Kindergarten

March 25-29

March 29  11:30 Dismissal

 

MOBILE DENTIST IS COMING TO Lindemann ON APRIL 22TH (SEE LINKS BELOW)

After-Hour Emergencies-1wmaa7e

Letter to Parents – Big Smile – English-Spanish (1)-178vxyg

image.png

5 Pairs of Gently worn, used or new shoes = Saves 1 Baby’s Life!

Kiwanis is conducting a used shoe drive from March 11 – 28th to raise funds for Project Eliminate.  All shoes are accepted unless they are torn or have holes in them.  There will be various drop off locations throughout the city – Offices in all Allen Park Public Schools, Allen Park Presbyterian Churches, Allen Park City Hall, Library and Community Center.

Are your kids ready to spring outside safely?

Children and parents are ready to spring outside to enjoy warmer temps and outdoor activities. Your kids are now a year older, so equipment that once fit may not, and new safety rules may apply, so do a safety check.

In the garage and yard

  • Check that all poisons are stored out of reach of children and pets. Common products that are poisonous to children include: pesticides, rust remover, gasoline, kerosene, paint thinner, lighter fluid, lamp oil, antifreeze and windshield washer fluid.
  • Toys stored on high shelves encourage kids to climb unsteady structures to reach them. Pull them down and organize them so kids can find them.
  • Items like rakes, brooms and ladders can fall or cause tripping hazards. Make sure they are mounted on the wall or stored securely out of reach.

At the playground

  • Check that the equipment is safe before your children start to play on it. Look for hazards such as rusted or broken equipment or dangerous surfaces. Report any hazards to the playground owner.
  • Active adult supervision is key. Lack of supervision is associated with approximately 45 percent of playground-related injuries.

On bikes and wheeled vehicles

  • Adjust your bicycle to fit: Check the owner’s manual for your bicycle to determine proper fit.
  • Check your equipment: Before riding, inflate tires properly and check that your brakes work.
  • Ensure a properly fitted bicycle helmet: Correctly fitted bicycle helmets have been shown to reduce the risk of head injury by 45%. Information about helmet fitting can be found on safekids.org.
  • Wear a helmet whenever you are on wheels: Helmets should be worn when riding all wheeled vehicles, including skateboards, scooters and skates. Add elbow, wrist and knee pads for more protection.
  • Adults need helmets too: The best way to protect your head is to wear a helmet. Parents, make it a practice to wear a helmet when you bike. It’s easier to convince your kids to stay safe if you model safety too.

On the road

  • Review pedestrian safety: Make sure your kids know to actively watch out for cars when playing outside or walking down the street. Teach kids to cross only at intersections, look left, right and left again, to stay on sidewalks or paths and to put phones, earbuds and devices away to stay distraction-free.
  • When driving, be especially alert and slow down in residential neighborhoods and school zones. Be on the lookout for bikers, walkers or runners who may be distracted or may step into the street unexpectedly.

March 4- 17

Image result for st patricks day imagesMarch 4 – 17

3/4 Healthy Kids Club 3:40

3/5 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30, Chess Club 3:30

3/6 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

3/7 Healthy Kids Club 3:40, PTA Meeting 6:00

3/8 End Of Second Trimester, 11:30 Dismissal

3/11  Mad Science Club 3:35

3/12  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30, Chess Club 3:30

3/13  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

Come support the Allen Park, St. Francis Cabrini,
Inter-City Baptist, and Divine Child High Schools
at their FRC Competitions for the 2019 season.

FIRST Robotics Competition Flyer 2019-13l3zxq

Parent’s Guide to a Growth Mindset

Guide_to_a_Growth_Mindset_(1)-17rcks1

Image result for school lunch golden tray clipartGolden Tray Winners

Week of February 18

Mrs. Rice’s Class, Ms. Messina’s Class,Miss Darin’s Class,

Mrs. Torok’s Class,Mrs. Kusulas’ Class, Ms. Soranno’s Class

Week of February 25

Mrs. A’s Class, Ms Robertson’s Class, Mrs. Torok’s Class

Mrs. Lacey’s Class, Mrs. Bergman’s Class

Think Green!

There is a day in March that is associated with the color green–St. Patrick’s Day, which
is always on March 17 th . Why not try to eat as many green foods as you can on that day
for breakfast, lunch, snacks and dinner? And of course those foods should be healthy
ones! You could have green apples (they are healthier if you leave the peels on),
broccoli (cooked or raw), celery (try filling it with peanut butter and topping it with
raisins), green grapes, or sliced, raw green peppers. Try spinach pasta or wraps. Have
a green salad (lettuce or spinach). Ask your children to think of other green foods they
like that are also nutritious.

A Healthy Lunch Helps Kids Stay on Task All Afternoon

If your child buys his or her meals from the school cafeteria, you should know that every
lunch is required to have at least one fruit and vegetable. Ask your child what fruit and
vegetable was served that day and if they ate it! If your child brings a lunch from home
to school, make sure it has at least one fruit or veggie, a whole grain food such as bread
or crackers, and a low-fat dairy choice. Mix it up! Throw in a different fruit or vegetable so
your children are surprised by a new color, taste, or texture when it’s time to eat.
The easiest way to include a dairy food is to have the milk offered at school. Trail mix
and dry cereal are other ways to include a whole grain in your child’s lunch. Avoid sugary
beverages including pop, juice drinks, and sports drinks. Water or low-fat milk are the best choice.

DONATIONS NEEDED PLEASE 
MAKER DAY

maker day-2o03sxv

FOUNDERS DAY Banquet

Congratulations Recipients!!

Founder’s Day Recipients 2019
Outstanding Educator- Mr. Fasca
Outstanding Program- Bingo for Books
Business Partner of the Year- Ruby Photo
Michigan Life Membership Award- Mr. Carlini
Outstanding Support Personnel- Sue Knoch
Distinguished Service Award – Cheryl Frank

Not Pictured: Cheryl Frank

Books, Literature, Read, Worn, PaperThis year once again we will be hosting many activities during March is Reading Month.  If you have any gently used books you would like to donate to the cause, we would greatly appreciate it!!!  All books can be brought to Mrs. Woods in the media center.

Lindemann-H Illumination Flyer 2019-2n49m26

Lindemann-V Imagination flyer 2019-14i7jmr

Mrs.  Michelle Chimenti

Congratulations!!

STRENGTHEN YOUR CHILD’S MENTAL HEALTH

This visual is a great reminder that there are many things that we can do to help our children develop healthy mental habits.

Lindemann Lions!!

2019 Michigan Green School Award Recipient

 Congratulations! Because of the hard work from the teachers, students and families, Lindemann Elementary School has received the 2019 Michigan Green School designation, by completing at least 10 energy saving and environmental tasks.

Save the Date: May 10, 2019 for the Recognition/Reward Ceremony. The new, exciting location will be announced early March.

National School Breakfast Week    March 4-8 

KUDOS from Mrs. Bowdell

Here is a group of very cooperative and hardworking “Shark” jumpers in gym class!  

Mrs. Lorenz 4th Grade Projects

The students did such an awesome job presenting their biography projects this week!  I could not be more proud as their teacher!  Check out the photos of all of these amazing figures. 🙂 The way the showcase is, I had to take two photos of both sides to capture them all.  Enjoy and have a great weekend!

WINTER UPDATES

It’s that time of year!  Please remember to call the office to report your child’s absence, as well as any information on communicable diseases.  Students should be fever-free without the use of fever-reducing medication for 24 hours before returning to school.  Help all of our Lions to stay healthy this winter by encouraging hand washing, sneezing into an elbow, and eating and resting properly each day!

 

 

 

February 18 – March 3

 Image result for winter clip art
February 18- March 3
2/18- 2/19 Winter Break
2/20   Founder’s Dinner 6:00
2/21  PTA Meeting 6:00
2/25 Healthy Kids Club 3:40
2/26 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30, Chess Club 3:30
2/27  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30
2/28  Healthy Kids Club 3:40

Vision

…to inspire a passion for lifelong learning.

Mission

Our mission is to empower all students to be advocates for themselves and others.  Each student will be taught essential life-long skills in a secure, respectful environment.

                    Foot print

 Golden Tray Lunchroom Winners

Image result for school lunch golden tray clipart

                          Week of  2/8  Winners:

Miss Partin’s Class, Mr. Wahl’s Class

Mrs. A’s Class, Mrs. Kusulas’s Class

Miss Messina’s Class, Mr. Lafferty’s Class

Mrs. Lacey’s Class

Week of 2/15 Winners

Mrs Latigo’s Class, Ms Robertson’s Class,

Mrs Lacey’s Class, Mr Wahl’s Class,

Mr. Lafferty’s Class and Ms Soranno’s Class

 
  
Your Words Matter
 
 

Get Moving!

The recommended amount of physical activity for children is at least 60 minutes per
day. Building Healthy Communities gets kids moving in four ways: (1) through a quality,
physical education curriculum, including new equipment, (2) encouraging students to be
active during recess, (3) offering short physical activity breaks in classrooms, and (4)
having a before– or after-school Healthy Kids Club which offers non-competitive
physical activity in a safe and supervised setting. Encourage your child to be physically
active at home and do LESS sitting around. Encourage them to turn the TV or computer
off to move around more in ways they enjoy. When you do watch TV, think of fun
movements to do during the commercials. Invite your kids to go with you when you walk
the dog or shovel snow. Maybe you can walk to school together instead of driving. You
will be surprised how easy it is to reach that 60-minute goal if you build physically
activity into your day at several different times. However you choose to do it, just get
moving!

March is Reading Month. March is Nutrition Month.

Health and reading go hand-in-hand! The Building Healthy Communities program
combines healthy eating education with reading in many ways. From sending home
healthy home works to reading nutrition labels in class, your child is developing in both
reading and health knowledge. There are also lots of ways to incorporate reading and
nutrition at home! Be on the lookout for the “Healthy Parent Tip Sheets” created by the
USDA and read them with your children. Visit your local library and get a book on the
importance of healthy eating and being physically active or pick out a cookbook and try
making a recipe together!

BINGO for BOOKS Donations

This year once again we will be hosting many activities during March is Reading Month.  If you have any gently used books you would like to donate to the cause, we would greatly appreciate it!!!  All books can be brought to Mrs. Woods in the media center.

 

Mach 8 & 29   11:30 Dismissal
 
Mrs Bowdell’s Shout Out!!
Here is a picture of the only set of kids in my phys.ed. teaching career who have ever been able to do double-dutch jump roping!  They practiced for months and have been getting better by the week 🙂

ANOTHER Weather Day!!!!!

On an unexpected day off from school everyone wants to do something different and kids are out of their routine. Kids feel it is a good day to sit at home and just hang out all day. But, with a little direction and a to do list, you can make a productive and memorable day off for them. With a list of exciting and different activities this can make the day more FUN and productive.
Here are some great ideas. Once of these may even turn into a new hobby for your child.
 Create a mini garden or plant pots for indoors;
 create a photo album or a glitter jar;
 build something with legos, blocks, or even build a fort;
 create upcoming holiday cards or artwork, (example: Valentines, Mother’s Day cards) or a
special card for someone that needs a “pick me up” (cards for the sick, or a veteran);
 create artwork to put in frames and display or as a future gift to someone;
 play or create your own board game;
 baking together or trying a new recipe;
 decluttering, cleaning and reorganizing always makes you feel better!


Spring Fever
 – Table rentals are still available for the Craft & Vendor Show and the Mom 2 Mom sale on March 9, 2019 at APHS.  More information and rental contracts are available on our website: https://apptacouncil.weebly.com/.  Feel free to share this information with friends and neighbors who may be interested in participating!  Proceeds from Spring Fever go to the Allen Park PTA/PTSA Council Scholarship Fund.

Spring Fever Craft & Vendor Show-Now Renting Tables-25kl4vd

 

image.png

 

February 18 – March 3

 Image result for winter clip art
February 18- March 3
2/18- 2/19 Winter Break
2/20   Founder’s Dinner 6:00
2/21  PTA Meeting 6:00
2/25 Healthy Kids Club 3:40
2/26 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30, Chess Club 3:30
2/27  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30
2/28  Healthy Kids Club 3:40

Vision

…to inspire a passion for lifelong learning.

Mission

Our mission is to empower all students to be advocates for themselves and others.  Each student will be taught essential life-long skills in a secure, respectful environment.

                    Foot print

 Golden Tray Lunchroom Winners

Image result for school lunch golden tray clipart

                          Week of  2/8  Winners:

Miss Partin’s Class, Mr. Wahl’s Class

Mrs. A’s Class, Mrs. Kusulas’s Class

Miss Messina’s Class, Mr. Lafferty’s Class

Mrs. Lacey’s Class

Week of 2/15 Winners

Mrs Latigo’s Class, Ms Robertson’s Class,

Mrs Lacey’s Class, Mr Wahl’s Class,

Mr. Lafferty’s Class and Ms Soranno’s Class

 
  
Your Words Matter
 
 

Get Moving!

The recommended amount of physical activity for children is at least 60 minutes per
day. Building Healthy Communities gets kids moving in four ways: (1) through a quality,
physical education curriculum, including new equipment, (2) encouraging students to be
active during recess, (3) offering short physical activity breaks in classrooms, and (4)
having a before– or after-school Healthy Kids Club which offers non-competitive
physical activity in a safe and supervised setting. Encourage your child to be physically
active at home and do LESS sitting around. Encourage them to turn the TV or computer
off to move around more in ways they enjoy. When you do watch TV, think of fun
movements to do during the commercials. Invite your kids to go with you when you walk
the dog or shovel snow. Maybe you can walk to school together instead of driving. You
will be surprised how easy it is to reach that 60-minute goal if you build physically
activity into your day at several different times. However you choose to do it, just get
moving!

March is Reading Month. March is Nutrition Month.

Health and reading go hand-in-hand! The Building Healthy Communities program
combines healthy eating education with reading in many ways. From sending home
healthy home works to reading nutrition labels in class, your child is developing in both
reading and health knowledge. There are also lots of ways to incorporate reading and
nutrition at home! Be on the lookout for the “Healthy Parent Tip Sheets” created by the
USDA and read them with your children. Visit your local library and get a book on the
importance of healthy eating and being physically active or pick out a cookbook and try
making a recipe together!

Mach 8 & 29   11:30 Dismissal
 
Mrs Bowdell’s Shout Out!!
Here is a picture of the only set of kids in my phys.ed. teaching career who have ever been able to do double-dutch jump roping!  They practiced for months and have been getting better by the week 🙂

ANOTHER Weather Day!!!!!

On an unexpected day off from school everyone wants to do something different and kids are out of their routine. Kids feel it is a good day to sit at home and just hang out all day. But, with a little direction and a to do list, you can make a productive and memorable day off for them. With a list of exciting and different activities this can make the day more FUN and productive.
Here are some great ideas. Once of these may even turn into a new hobby for your child.
 Create a mini garden or plant pots for indoors;
 create a photo album or a glitter jar;
 build something with legos, blocks, or even build a fort;
 create upcoming holiday cards or artwork, (example: Valentines, Mother’s Day cards) or a
special card for someone that needs a “pick me up” (cards for the sick, or a veteran);
 create artwork to put in frames and display or as a future gift to someone;
 play or create your own board game;
 baking together or trying a new recipe;
 decluttering, cleaning and reorganizing always makes you feel better!


Spring Fever
 – Table rentals are still available for the Craft & Vendor Show and the Mom 2 Mom sale on March 9, 2019 at APHS.  More information and rental contracts are available on our website: https://apptacouncil.weebly.com/.  Feel free to share this information with friends and neighbors who may be interested in participating!  Proceeds from Spring Fever go to the Allen Park PTA/PTSA Council Scholarship Fund.

Spring Fever Craft & Vendor Show-Now Renting Tables-25kl4vd

 

image.png

 

February 4 – 17

 

February 4-17

Spirit Week February 4-8

2/4  Healthy Kids Club 3:40

2/5  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

2/6  LBC 3:30, Parent/Teacher Conferences 5-7:30

2/7 Parent/ Teacher Conferences 5-7:30

2/8 Mother/Son Event 6-9

2/11 Healthy Kids Club 3:40

2/12  LBC 3:30

2/13 Desserts with Dad 6:00

2/14 Valentine’s Day

2/15 Half Day 11:30 Dismissal

Vision 

…to inspire a passion for lifelong learning.

Mission

Our mission is to empower all students to be advocates for themselves and others.  Each student will be taught essential life-long skills in a secure, respectful environment.

                    Foot print

 February 4-8 (Rescheduled)

Monday-School Spirit (Lindemann, AP, or College)

Tuesday- Sports/Hobby Day

Wednesday- Dress Wacky Day

Thursday- Career Day (Dress as what you want to be when you grow up)

Friday- Character Day (Dress as your favorite Disney character, super hero, book or cartoon character)

 

The recommended amount of physical activity for children is at least 60 minutes per
day. Building Healthy Communities gets kids moving in four ways: (1) through a quality,
physical education curriculum, including new equipment, (2) encouraging students to be
active during recess, (3) offering short physical activity breaks in classrooms, and (4)
having a before– or after-school Healthy Kids Club which offers non-competitive
physical activity in a safe and supervised setting. Encourage your child to be physically
active at home and do LESS sitting around. Encourage them to turn the TV or computer
off to move around more in ways they enjoy. When you do watch TV, think of fun
movements to do during the commercials. Invite your kids to go with you when you walk
the dog or shovel snow. Maybe you can walk to school together instead of driving. You
will be surprised how easy it is to reach that 60-minute goal if you build physically
activity into your day at several different times. However you choose to do it, just get

2019 Board of Education

 Mr. Gordon Miller – President

Mr. Michael J. Klein – Vice President of Operations

Mr. Robert Loyd – Vice President of Human Resources

Mrs. Jeannette MacDonald – Vice President of Teaching & Learning

Mr. Rick Moynihan – Vice President of Extra Curricular Issues

Mrs. Julie Sheppard – Secretary

Dr. Jennifer Warren – Treasurer

 Michigan’s Updated Parent Dashboard for
School Transparency—Available Now
Michigan’s Parent Dashboard for School Transparency
has been enhanced with updated data and new types of
information. The online Parent Dashboard, available to
the public on MI School Data (www.MISchoolData.org/
ParentDashboard), received more than 1,000,000 views in
its first year and can be accessed on any computer or
mobile device.
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Parent/Teacher Conferences

Winter conferences are coming up quick on February 6 and 7 from 5:00-7:30 each night.  This conference is slightly different in that not every family generally attends, but is still open as an option for all who would like a conference with the teacher.  Some fast facts:

1. If your classroom teacher is requesting a conference with you, you will receive a notice.

2. If you did not receive a notice from the teacher, you may still request a conference with the teacher OR decide that you don’t feel a conference is necessary at this time.

3. All classroom links will come from the teacher and be live on this Friday’s  blog release to sign up for a time on signupgenius for those who need to attend conferences.

4. Report Cards go home on March 15

Parent Surveys

It’s that time of year already in our school improvement planning where we need to send out surveys to our Lindemann stakeholders.  You will have the opportunity to take a brief survey from the State of Michigan rating some of your experiences here at Lindemann.  The survey will be available  until Feb. 9.  We have already e blasted the email and have provided it for you below.  If you are unable to access via computer, we will also have a computer set up in the office if you wish to take it there.  Giving us good feedback helps us plan better to meet the needs of every Lion stakeholder.  In addition, students and staff also take a similar survey during the school day.

All of the feedback you provide is then summarized and becomes part of our school improvement plan for the 2018-19 school year.  Thank you very much, please click on the link to start the survey:

 Parent Survey:
http://www.advanc-ed.org/survey/public/2202307

 

READ BY GRADE 3 UPDATE

Parents of students in grades K-2: Please stay informed about the implications of the 3rd Grade Reading Law, often called “Read by Grade 3”, and the process that will be used to identify students possibly affected by this legislation.  The Individualized Reading Improvement Plans, or IRIPs, that are distributed following our benchmark assessments are designed to help families stay aware of what supports are in place here at school, and encourage support at home for those students who are not performing at grade level on standardized assessments.

11 Ways Parents Can Help Their Children Read

September 9, 2015

Parents often ask how they can help their children learn to read; and it’s no wonder that they’re interested in this essential skill. Reading plays an important role in later school success. One study even demonstrates that how well 7-year-olds read predicts their income 35 years later!

Here are 11 practical recommendations for helping preschoolers and school-age students learn to read.

1. Teaching reading will only help.

Sometimes, parents are told early teaching is harmful, but it isn’t true. You simply can’t introduce literacy too early. I started reading to my own children on the days they were each born! The “dangers of early teaching” has been a topic of study for more than 100 years, and no one has ever found any convincing evidence of harm. Moreover, there are hundreds of studies showing the benefits of reading to your children when they are young.

2. Teaching literacy isn’t different than teaching other skills.

You don’t need a Ph.D. to raise a happy, healthy, smart child. Parents have been doing it for thousands of years. Mothers and fathers successfully teach their kids to eat with a spoon, use a potty, keep their fingers out of their noses, and say “please.” These things can be taught pleasantly, or they can be made into a painful chore. Being unpleasant (e.g. yelling, punishing, pressuring) doesn’t work, and it can be frustrating for everyone. This notion applies to teaching literacy, too. If you show your 18-month-old a book and she shows no interest, then put it away and come back to it later. If your child tries to write her name and ends up with a backwards “D,” no problem. No pressure. No hassle. You should enjoy the journey, and so should your child.

3. Talk to your kids (a lot).

Last year, I spent lots of time with our brand new granddaughter, Emily. I drowned her in language. Although “just a baby,” I talked — and sang — to her about everything. I talked about her eyes, nose, ears, mouth, and fingers. I told her all about her family — her mom, dad, and older brother. I talked to her about whatever she did (yawning, sleeping, eating, burping). I talked to her so much that her parents thought I was nuts; she couldn’t possibly understand me yet. But reading is a language activity, and if you want to learn language, you’d better hear it, and eventually, speak it. Too many moms and dads feel a bit dopey talking to a baby or young child, but studies have shown that exposing your child to a variety of words helps in her development of literacy skills.

4. Read to your kids.

I know everyone says this, but it really is a good idea — at least with preschoolers. One of my colleagues refers to this advice as the “chicken soup” of reading education. We prescribe it for everything. (Does it help? It couldn’t hurt.) If a parent or caregiver can’t read or can’t read English, there are alternatives, such as using audiobooks; but for those who can, reading a book or story to a child is a great, easy way to advance literacy skills. Research shows benefitsfor kids as young as 9-months-old, and it could be effective even earlier than that. Reading to kids exposes them to richer vocabulary than they usually hear from the adults who speak to them, and can have positive impacts on their language, intelligence, and later literacy achievement. What should you read to them? There are so many wonderful children’s books. Visit your local library, and you can get an armful of adventure. You can find recommendations from kids at the Children’s Book Council website or at the International Literacy Association Children’s Choices site, as well as free books online at other websites like Search Lit or Unite for Literacy.

5. Have them tell you a “story.”

One great way to introduce kids to literacy is to take their dictation. Have them recount an experience or make up a story. We’re not talking “Moby Dick” here. A typical first story may be something like, “I like fish. I like my sister. I like grandpa.” Write it as it is being told, and then read it aloud. Point at the words when you read them, or point at them when your child is trying to read the story. Over time, with lots of rereading, don’t be surprised if your child starts to recognize words such as “I” or “like.” (As children learn some of the words, you can write them on cards and keep them in a “word bank” for your child, using them to review later.)

6. Teach phonemic awareness.

Young children don’t hear the sounds within words. Thus, they hear “dog,” but not the “duh”-“aw”- “guh.” To become readers, they have to learn to hear these sounds (or phonemes). Play language games with your child. For instance, say a word, perhaps her name, and then change it by one phoneme: Jen-Pen, Jen-Hen, Jen-Men. Or, just break a word apart: chair… ch-ch-ch-air. Follow this link to learn more about language development milestones in children.

7. Teach phonics (letter names and their sounds).

You can’t sound out words or write them without knowing the letter sounds. Most kindergartens teach the letters, and parents can teach them, too. I just checked a toy store website and found 282 products based on letter names and another 88 on letter sounds, including ABC books, charts, cards, blocks, magnet letters, floor mats, puzzles, lampshades, bed sheets, and programs for tablets and computers. You don’t need all of that (a pencil and paper are sufficient), but there is lots of support out there for parents to help kids learn these skills. Keep the lessons brief and fun, no more than 5–10 minutes for young’uns. Understanding the different developmental stages of reading and writing skills will help to guide your lessons and expectations.

8. Listen to your child read.

When your child starts bringing books home from school, have her read to you. If it doesn’t sound good (mistakes, choppy reading), have her read it again. Or read it to her, and then have her try to read it herself. Studies show that this kind of repeated oral reading makes students better readers, even when it is done at home.

9. Promote writing.

Literacy involves reading and writing. Having books and magazines available for your child is a good idea, but it’s also helpful to have pencils, crayons, markers, and paper. Encourage your child to write. One way to do this is to write notes or short letters to her. It won’t be long before she is trying to write back to you.

10. Ask questions.

When your child reads, get her to retell the story or information. If it’s a story, ask who it was about and what happened. If it’s an informational text, have your child explain what it was about and how it worked, or what its parts were. Reading involves not just sounding out words, but thinking about and remembering ideas and events. Improving reading comprehension skills early will prepare her for subsequent success in more difficult texts.

11. Make reading a regular activity in your home.

Make reading a part of your daily life, and kids will learn to love it. When I was nine years old, my mom made me stay in for a half-hour after lunch to read. She took me to the library to get books to kick off this new part of my life. It made me a lifelong reader. Set aside some time when everyone turns off the TV and the web and does nothing but read. Make it fun, too. When my children finished reading a book that had been made into a film, we’d make popcorn and watch the movie together. The point is to make reading a regular enjoyable part of your family routine.

Happy reading!

Sources:

Ritchie, S.J., & Bates, T.C. (2013). Enduring links from childhood mathematics and reading achievement to adult socioeconomic status. Psychological Science, 24, 1301-1308.

Karass J., & Braungart-Rieker J. (2005). Effects of shared parent-infant reading on early language acquisition. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 26, 133-148.

 

January 21- February 3

January 21-February 1

1/21 Martin Luther KIng Jr Day/ No School/ Staff PD

1/22 Fifth Grade LBC (Lindemann Basketball Club)

1/23 Fifth Grade LBC (Lindemann Basketball Club)

1/28- 2/1 PTA Spirit Week

1/28 Healthy Kids Club 3:40

1/28 Board Meeting

1/29 Fifth Grade LBC (Lindemann Basketball Club)

1/30 Fifth Grade LBC (Lindemann Basketball Club)

1/31 Healthy Kids Club 3:40

2/1 PBIS Monthly Reward

 

January 28- February 1

Monday-School Spirit (Lindemann, AP, or College)

Tuesday- Sports/Hobby Day

Wednesday- Dress Wacky Day

Thursday- Career Day (Dress as what you want to be when you grow up)

Friday- Character Day (Dress as your favorite Disney character, super hero, book or cartoon character)

2019 Board of Education

 Mr. Gordon Miller – President

Mr. Michael J. Klein – Vice President of Operations

Mr. Robert Loyd – Vice President of Human Resources

Mrs. Jeannette MacDonald – Vice President of Teaching & Learning

Mr. Rick Moynihan – Vice President of Extra Curricular Issues

Mrs. Julie Sheppard – Secretary

Dr. Jennifer Warren – Treasurer

The insight, concern for the well-being of all students, and professional experiences of these civic-minded individuals will contribute significantly to the Allen Park Public Schools.  We are grateful for their commitment to serve the school community and wish everyone the best of luck as we strive to make this year the very best for children throughout the District.

Allen Park Community Center youth programs strengthen your child’s creative muscles while building self-confidence.

  • Love Dr. Seuss books? Make sure you grab a seat when characters of the pages come to life onstage the last weekend in January. Youth Theater presents Seussical Jr. January 25-26 
  • Junior Chef: Create delicious winter dishes while learning kitchen basics. The best part is tasting your food!
  • Allen Park Dance (Creative Movement, Ballet, Tap, Broadway Jazz) Classes start for dancers as young as 3. Register online by January 31!

Registration for all classes can be completed online – creativecharacters.org

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Healthy Hearts

Make this your healthiest Valentine’s Day yet! A focus of Building Healthy Communities is to have healthy foods and drinks available at our classroom celebrations. Soon It will be Valentine’s Day and we would love to have some healthy options for students to enjoy. We can teach students that parties can include treats that taste great AND are  healthy.

Themes for this holiday are hearts and the colors red and pink. Some Ideas for what to bring or send into school are; red apples, red seedless grapes, or strawberry yogurt. Use a heart-shaped cookie cutter to cut cheese slices. Make a healthy fruit roll-up: spread strawberry cream cheese on a whole grain tortilla, and top with red fruits or vegetables. How about a pink smoothie? Add some strawberry milk with yogurt and blend.

We Live In a Winter Wonderland!

It can be hard to stay active all winter when it is cold outside and it gets dark early. However, it is just as important to exercise during the winter months as it is in the summer. Does your child like to go sledding, build a snow fort or lust take a quick walk outslde? Can you think of ways your family can be active inside? Put dance music on, go up and down the stairs a few times, do some stretches or yoga poses, or march in place while you watch TV. These and other activities will get your family off the couch, exercise their hearts, and Improve circulation. 

Congratulations to our District Reflection Winners!!  Heading to States!!!  So proud of these students!

Jayden Smith
Jorge Garcia Jr
Lainie Nagel
Elalia Garcia
Daniel Assenmacher
Emma Frank

Head Lice Reminder

From your School Nurses
Post Date: 01/07/2019 4:43 PM

This is the time of year when we do see cases of head lice in the school setting. Please contact the school office if you child has head lice. There is important information on head lice on the Head Lice Toolbox page on the Health & Safety section of the district website. Thank you.

There is not a known case of lice at this time. The P-CCS Nurses share this information on a regular basis as an awareness and prevention message. Head lice is most common in the younger grades.

stop sign with head lice image

We see an increase in head lice in the school setting after school start, Halloween time, and in the weeks following holiday and school breaks. There has been a change in the head lice district guideline. We will no longer be sending classroom letters home when there is a case of head lice identified in your child’s classroom. It is important that student confidentiality is maintained. It is recommended that you check your child’s head weekly. If you do find any lice or eggs in your child’s hair, please contact the school office and the school nurse.

Head lice is often found among the school age population. It is transmitted via head to head contact. The best way to prevent getting head lice is to not share any items that touch the head especially combs, brushes and hats. Checking your child’s head a couple times a week during the school year and more often with class return to school after school breaks is important. We typically see an increase in head lice at the beginning of the school year and after vacation and school breaks. Transmission of head lice is rarely from the school environment. Head lice is most often transmitted during sleep-overs, play dates, family gatherings, after school activities such as girl scout or boy scout outings, play practices, gymnastics, and sporting events to name a few.

The LICEMEISTER comb is a very good comb to use for both prevention and treatment of head lice. The comb can be used to comb through your child’s head at least weekly as a preventive and early diagnostic measure. Any live lice will be caught in the close metal tines of the comb. Eggs will also be found on the comb. This comb is a valuable tool when treating lice. The eggs must be removed after shampooing head to kill the live lice. The eggs must be manually removed to ensure appropriate and thorough treatment. This comb will help with this. The LICEMEISTER comb (or any fine-toothed metal comb) can be found at grocery and drug stores or can be ordered at: http://www.headlice.org/licemeister/.

The HEAD LICE TOOLBOX contains a number of important educational documents that will assist you in identifying head lice, treatment of head lice, and prevention of head lice. The district guideline can also be found at this site. See http://www.pccsk12.com/departments/health-safety/head-lice-toolbox

Please contact your child’s school office if your child has head lice. The school nurse is available to help guide you through the treatment of head lice and help you in preventing any further head lice transmissions.

Buzzer System Reminder

We’d like to address a few items specific to the installation of the new Buzzer Security System here at Lindemann. In putting this system to work, there will be several changes to our Main Office operations:

The doors will only be open from 8:20-8:30 to allow for students to enter the building, the main office area doors will be locked starting at 8:45

In order to enter Lindemann at the main entrance after 8:45, you must push the buzzer, speak with the secretary, and they will unlock the door to allow you to enter.

**There will no procedural change for breakfast

Reasons to enter the building include:

Picking up your student early

Dropping off a cell phone, money or medication

Pre-arranged meeting with a teacher or other staff member

Please have picture ID ready to show the buzzer camera before gaining entry.  Note that we no longer have a public restroom available.

There will be a new cabinet located just outside the main office door where you will be able to drop off forgotten or other needed items for your student here. We just ask that you put a note with their name and grade on the item (supplies will be in the cabinet). Please do not buzz the office to let us know that you are dropping something off, this is not necessary. We will call students down for these items.

These items will be collected and brought inside for distribution

Items to be dropped off outside include: lunches, homework, books, water bottles, permission slips, shoes, etc. (no money, phones or medication)

Entry into the building to drop off these items will no longer be the procedure

While we feel comfortable with this new system, we do anticipate a few growing pains as parents, students and staff become accustomed to using it routinely. We ask for your patience as we balance the primary needs of our students with those of our staff and parents, both in person and on the phone.

The bottom line for implementation of this system is an added layer of security for our students and staff, and we know that our parents will work with us as we incorporate it into our daily routine. There may be changes made quickly, further down the road, or none at all as we find out what works best and most efficiently. And while every building within our district has this new buzzer system, the procedures here at Lindemann may differ slightly from other buildings.  

Again, we appreciate your patience and cooperation with these new procedures.

Happy New Year from APPS!

  • SKATE WITH THE JAGS

Bring the kids to “Skate with the Jags” Hockey Team on Sunday, January 13 from 1-3 pm at the AP Civic Arena – details attached!

  • APAC

Online registration open and walk-in registration dates for tee-ball, softball, baseball and hardball through the Allen Park Athletic Club – more info attached!

  • ARTS DETROIT… Dance, Music & Theatre Classes in Allen Park

Did you know Arts Detroit has a new location in Allen Park?  (14709 Champaign – across from APMS)  Dance, Music and Theatre Classes offered for 8 weeks from January 21 thru March 17 – class schedule and registration info attached.

  • EVENING HALL WALKING IN APPS

Looking for indoor exercise this winter?  APHS opens its halls to the public from January 14 thru May 3 – Monday thru Friday – 6:00-8:00 p.m. – details attached!

HELP WANTED!!!!!

LOOKING FOR PART-TIME WORK WHEN THE KIDS ARE IN SCHOOL?  APPS is seeking substitutes in all areas – teaching, food service, secretarial, lunch/playground aides, maintenance/custodial, bus drivers.  You pick the days you can and can’t work – apply today at http://www.Edustaff.org

  • NEWS FROM FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT

Start the New Year off on a positive note.  Please pay all negative meal account balances by sending in cash, check (payable to APPS) or make an online payment through http://www.mypaymentsplus.com.  Remember, breakfast is available in all school cafeterias every day.  Start your kids off with a nutritious breakfast!  Info/details attached!

ART brings HS and Lindemann Together

Kindergarten students are studying Kandinsky and his musical inspirations in his abstract work. The following high school students provided the musical background as our kindergarteners painted from the musical inspiration.
Rachel Wisniewski: Flute
Abbey Michalak: Clarinet
Rachel Cronkhite: Saxophone
Ellie Jackson: Trumpet
Chris Tomalka: Bells

January 7-20

 

1/7 Classes Resume

1/10  PTA Meeting 6:00

1/14  Healthy Kids Club 3:40

1/15 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

1/16  Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

1/17 Healthy Kids Club 3:40

1/21 Kids No School/ Staff PD

1/22 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

1/23 Lindemann Basketball Club 3:30

Second Grade GRINCH Day!

 

 

1/22 Leslie Bartnick (Technology)

Reflecting on the Last Year

The school year is almost half over. Reflect back on the past year. Did you make any positive health changes since the beginning of the school year? Are you thinking about making any now? Have you noticed any changes in your child(ren)’s physical activity level or their willingness to try new foods? Is your family eating more fruits or veggies? Do you have low-fat dairy items available? Are your kids drinking sugary drinks less often?  Are they asking for healthier snacks to take to school?  Little changes add up to a big payoff for your family. We wish you a healthy New Year!

Follow the Leader!

Parents/guardians, teachers, principals, classmates and siblings are all important role models for young children. They DO notice what you eat and drink, and if you’re physically active on a regular basis. At school, we are talking about healthy habits and encouraging students to follow our lead. You can do the same by making healthy choices related to food and physical activity, and talking about them with your child(ren). Eating fruits and vegetables with and in front of your child(ren) is important. Choose ones you like, since kids can tell if you’re just pretending to like them. No one likes every vegetable; it’s OK to have favorites. Limit sugary drinks like pop, juice drinks and sports drinks. If your child shops with you, check the label and talk about what you find. Put fewer of the less healthy choices in your grocery basket. We can’t expect children to make healthy choices if we don’t!

Miss Stephanie Partin

 

FUN at the NORTH POLE

Founder’s Day Recipients 2019
Outstanding Educator- Mr. Fasca
Outstanding Program- Bingo for Books
Business Partner of the Year- Ruby Photo
Michigan Life Membership Award- Mr. Carlini
Outstanding Support Personnel- Sue Knoch
Distinguished Service Award – Cheryl Frank
December Pride Paw Leaders
Congratulations on being RESPECTFUL< RESPONSIBLE<SAFE
Jackie Caswell
McKenna Gomez
Easton Danosky
Donovan Lennie
Justis Eddins
Liliana Latigo
Justin Baksa
Lily Powers
Brayden Nasutovich
Rocco Tuccini
Maxxon Sulla
Emmy Komray
Rudolph
Jack Woods
Francesco Julian
Jack Doty
Matthew Danley
McKenzie Durocher
Alex Burgo
Frosty
Dominic Raidl
Asher Scroggins
Owen Maxwell
Rania Ahmed
Ashton Keith
Josh Gregoire
Jacob Schleicher

Parent_Help_Reading

Parent_Help_Math_600

STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING ANXIETY

This article contains great suggestions, regardless of whether your child struggles with anxiety on a regular basis or not.  All children may feel this way from time to time.  

 

It’s happening again. Your daughter is frustrated and stomping away down to her room, slamming the door and in general “has her cranky pants on”. You say calm down, but she yells back “I don’t know how to do that!!!”

We tend to tell our kids to “calm down” without ever giving them explicit directions on how to deal with stress and anxiety. Here’s a collection of the best tools and tips I’ve found to teach children how to calm down and relax.

Quick Ways to Calm Down

Sometimes you’ll need a quick way to help your child calm down and you don’t have much with you. Maybe it’s when you’re out at Target or stuck in traffic. These tips will come in handy at those times:

  • Imagine your favorite place – it’s like taking a mini vacation wherever you are
  • Think of your favorite things
  • Name animals alphabetically (alligator, bear, cow, dog, etc…)
  • Squeeze Something (play dough, clay, silly putty, your fists, a stress ball)
  • Get a Cold Drink of Water
  • 54321 Grounding – go through each of your 5 senses

December 10-22

December 10- 21

12/10   5th Grade Fundraiser Pick-up 3:30, Board Meeting 7:00

12/12 Santa Secret Shop

12/13 Santa Secret Shop,  Third Grade Field Trip

12/14 Half Day/PD

12/18  Elementary Honor Choir 6:30

12/20 Lindemann Christmas Concert (4th/5th Grades) 6:30

1/10 Group Shots for Yearbook, PTA Meeting 6:00

Lindemann Family In Need

All items in Lost and Found will be donated to charity, if not claimed by December 20.

New Year Resolutions

As the New Year approaches, you might be thinking about creating some new healthy habits. Here are a few tips to set you up for success.

  • First, decide what exactly you want or don’t want to do. Tell others what you’re working on and encourage them to help you stick to your goal.
  • Make sure your goal is realistic. Take on only what you can handle.
  • Next, create a plan. Ask yourself what steps you need to take to get to your goal. If you want to drink less pop, then maybe the first step is to get it out of the house.
  • Remember to celebrate small steps. Change is difficult, so give yourself credit for any amount of change and don’t let set backs cause you to give up. Good health is worth working for!

Honor Choir Concert December 18 @ 6:30  Center for the Arts

Christmas Concert (4th and 5th Grades) December 20 @ 6:30 Center for the Arts

Downriver Families Against Narcotics Monthly Forum. 
Topic: 
Honor the Memories of Loved Ones Lost and Celebrate the New Beginnings of Those in Recovery. 
Guest Speaker:  
Bridget Elkins, Certified Grief Support Specialist 
 Date/Time:
 12/20/18 at 6:30 p.m. (Refreshments starting at 6:00 p.m.)
 Place: 
Turning Point Clubhouse
1605 Fort St. Lincoln Park, 48146

Preventing Holiday Stress and Anxiety in Children

 By Katherine Lee

child sleeping on sofa at Christmas - holiday stress in children

The holidays are a fun and joyous time but also a very busy one, and holiday stress and anxiety in children can and does happen. During the holidays, there are lots of fun activities and events going on, both at home and at school. And while that can be a good thing, the reality is that all that hustle and bustle means schedules are often out of whack, bedtimes get pushed back, and routines are disrupted. As a result, it’s inevitable that kids may feel some degree of holiday stress.

 Set a Calm Example

The most important way parents can help ease anxiety in children during the holidays is by trying to keep things relaxed as much as possible. As with so many situations, the way parents handle an issue can set the tone for how their kids will behave. If you let holiday stress get to you, your kids will definitely pick up on it, and child anxiety is more likely to be a problem in your house. To minimize anxiety in children during the holidays, take steps to handle your own stress and anxiety.

 Set Up Conditions for Good Behavior

Avoid taking your child to places such as the mall or holiday gatherings when he is hungry or tired. It’s hard even for grown-ups to deal with noise and lots of stimulation when they’re not feeling their best; kids get hungry more often and become tired more easily, and may understandably have a tough time being on their best behavior and are more likely to experience holiday stress when they’re exhausted or hungry.

 Remember the Importance of Routines

The holidays can throw a big wrench into household routines, and that can play a role in anxiety in children. To minimize holiday stress in your kids, try to get routines back on track once an event or party is over. For instance, if a school holiday concert or a church gathering goes past your child’s bedtime, try to stick to quiet, calm activities the next day and get your child to bed on time the next night.

 Watch What They Are Eating

Another thing that can fall by the wayside amidst the holiday hubbub is healthy eating. Between all the extra sugary holiday snacks and the lack of time to sit down to regular meals, it can be all too easy for kids to eat less healthy foods, which can contribute to holiday stress and anxiety in children. Try packing healthy snacks when you have to go shopping or run other holiday errands and try to minimize the number of sweet treats at home. Whenever possible, offer healthy snacks, such as air-popped popcorn or apple slices with cheese and crackers and limit cookies and candy to after-snack treats.

 Get Your Child Moving

Fresh air and exercise are essential for boosting mood and re-setting the spirit, which can alleviate holiday stress and anxiety in children. Make sure you schedule some time to get your child outside to run around and play.

 Avoid Overscheduling

As tempting as it may be to accept every invitation from friends and family, try to limit your holiday parties and activities so that you and your child are not overwhelmed. A couple of events a week may be fine, but having an obligation every day can lead to holiday stress and anxiety in children.

 Have Your Grade-Schooler Help You

Big kids love to help mom and dad, especially if they get lots of praise for being responsible and helpful. If you have to shop, ask your child to help you look for an item at the store (fun stocking stuffers for cousins, for example). Giving your child a task will not only boost her self-esteem, it’ll distract her and help prevent any holiday stress and anxiety.

 Schedule Some Quiet Time

Having some peace and quiet with your child is more important than ever during the busy holiday season. Find a quiet corner and read a book with your child or create holiday pictures for grandma and grandpa. Take a walk outside in nature, away from noise and crowds and obligations.

 Remind Your Child and Yourself What the Holidays Are Really All About

A great antidote for holiday stress and the bloated commercialism of the season is helping others, whether it’s by shoveling an elderly neighbor’s sidewalk or by wrapping presents for needy kids at your local church. Helping your grade-schooler become a charitable child will help alleviate her holiday stress and anxiety.

 

Mrs. Bowdell

I LOST A TOOTH!!!

BEFORE and AFTER – A LOT of EFFORT!

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